Top 25 Most Popular Zombie Movies Of All Time – You Must Watch

Top 25 Most Popular Zombie Movies Of All Time – You Must Watch

Most films about the vicious zombies use symbolism and tell stories about actual events, with a focus on themes of destruction and disaster.

From newest to oldest, these are the top 25 best zombie movies ever made.

Author Joo Dong Geun’s well-known webtoon “Now at our school” served as the inspiration for the novel All of us are Dead. The movie narrates the tale of a group of high school students who had to flee their school after a zombie outbreak.

Starting with Mr. Lee Byung Chan, everything happens at Hyosan High School. was bitten shortly after and became a zombie. Furthermore, the zombie pandemic expanded worldwide. What needs to be done in order for the other students to survive?

All episodes are released on Netflix.

Ahn Gil-ho is the director of this 2021 thriller drama, which stars Park Hyung-sik and Han Hyo-joo. The main focus of the story is escaping the zombie apocalypse brought on by a virus.

A deadly new virus strain is making its way across the city. A residential complex housing individuals from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds is still under quarantine. Its inhabitants have to endure in their new environment while being afraid of the virus and possible disputes between different social groups.

Yoon Sae Bom’s sound judgment enables her to make decisions quickly. She can’t stand injustice and is self-righteous. Despite not having a healthy upbringing, she is determined to lead a comfortable life in a challenging world.

Specializing in violent crimes, Detective Jung Yi Hyun now finds it difficult to ensure the safety of the apartment occupants. The former baseball player had to retire early due to a knee injury.

Former military intelligence agent Han Tae Seok went on to become an executive in a pharmaceutical company. He is in a good position to handle infectious illnesses.

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3. Ashin of the North (2021)

One could consider this special “Kingdom” episode to be a prequel to a feature film. It narrates the tale of Ashin and the invention of the plant that transforms humans into vicious zombies. Ashin grew up in a remote village on the frontier.

When people from a nearby tribe perish while searching a prohibited area for wild ginseng, the authorities report that a tiger killed them, instructing Ashin’s father to share this information. He is not taken seriously. The only person to survive the attack on the village is Ashin. She begs the commander of the local military to assist her in exacting her revenge. She continues to improve her archery skills as he lets her remain in the base. She also discovers a flower that, according to inscriptions on an ancient shrine, has the power to raise the dead—but only for a cost. It will not be long before she exacts her retribution.

Jung Seok, portrayed by Gang Dong-won, is a broken soldier who managed to flee the Korean Peninsula, which is currently under constant lockdown due to the zombie pandemic. He is forced to accept an offer from the local triad goons in Hong Kong, where he is exiled, to lead a group inside Seoul to retrieve $20 million that was left in the back of a truck following an unsuccessful previous extraction attempt.

Combining the zombie movie and the heist film promises an exciting crossbreed. However, the robbery aspect is eliminated pretty quickly, and director Yeon Sang-ho then appears to be content to follow in the footsteps of earlier post-apocalyptic films, most notably Mad Max and Escape from New York. This area of the city is currently governed by Unit631, a renegade military unit that enjoys engaging any human survivors in cage-fighting-style skirmishes with the spreading undead.

The story of Night Devil centers on Prince Lee Chung (Hyun Bin), a renowned Joseon Dynasty martial arts expert. Lee Chung was taken prisoner and delivered to the Chinese Qing Dynasty. Lee Chung returned to the nation right away after hearing that Kim Tae-woo’s character, Crown Prince Lee Young, had taken his own life.

Bloodthirsty zombies that materialized only after dusk were encountered by Lee Chung on his way back to his hometown. Lee Chung must also battle the scheme to usurp Kim Ja-joon’s (Jang Dong-gun) throne, the legendary mandarin.

The total revenue from this comedy was $31.2 million. Both reviewers and viewers commended One Cut of the Dead for its original and inventive material.

The film centers on the deeply indebted director Higurashi. He went on to use an abandoned water purification plant as a filming location for the zombie film One Cut of the Dead. However, the cast was so awful that it brought him down. To add realism to the film, Higurashi used his blood to turn the zombies at this factory into living beings.

Zombies from Korea! a train! This violent, quick-witted, and frantic splatter film starts from the blueprint set by George A. Romero in Night of the Living Dead, wherein a group of survivors flee into a confined area to fend off zombie attacks. It’s not original. It’s certainly incredibly entertaining. Peninsula, the follow-up, fell short of the chaos of the first one. Let’s hope that Timo Tjahjanto, the genius behind The Night Comes for Us, can bring the gore in the remake, which is sure to happen in the United States.

Directed by: Sang Ho-yeon

Voice actors and actresses: Seung Ryong Ryu, Sang Hee Lee, Joon Lee…

Duration: 92 minutes

The adult animated series Seoul Station is regarded as a prequel to the legendary Train to Busan. The movie depicts how the zombie outbreak began in Korea.

Seoul Station serves as the setting for the film’s narrative. A homeless man with a bloody wound on his neck wanders the Seoul Station neighborhood. And he passed away in the station. His body disappeared before the cops could get there. Indeed, he became a zombie and began to attack people.

The girl who fled a brothel, Hye Sun, was also enmeshed in the chaos at the station. Hye Sun’s father is searching for her in the interim. The father and son were split up by zombies once more, just as they were going to be reunited with their daughter.

Directed by: Rob Thomas, Diane Ruggiero-Wright

Cast: Rose McIve, Malcolm Goodwin, Rahul Kohli, Robert Buckley, David Anders, Aly Michalka, Robert Knepper, Bryce Hodgson…

Length: 71 episodes (5 seasons)

Doctor Olivia “Liv” Moore (Rose McIve) was bitten and transformed into a zombie while at a boat party. To the dismay of her family, Olivia and her fiancé called it quits.

To survive, she has to consume human brains. She accepted a job as an autopsy doctor at a morgue to consume dead people’s brains because she didn’t want to hurt anyone else. Olivia was able to gather all of their memories and personalities as a result, which made the case easier to solve.

The apocalyptic sign has started. This grim drama, which is a prequel to AMC’s immensely popular “Walking Dead,” is emphasized by reports of a world that is changing quickly for unclear reasons. Madison Clark, a guidance counselor at a high school, tells the tale. The widowed mother is raising her two children on her own and still stays in touch with her post-apocalyptic partner, English teacher Travis Manawa. Unexpected chaos makes it more difficult for them to integrate their families, and the survival of the fittest becomes necessary.

In the most extravagant zombie movie ever made, Brad Pitt dons his boots designed for kicking zombies and embarks on a global journey to discover the origin of a zombie outbreak. It’s a gripping grand-scale romp up until the last third, when Brad unintentionally ends up hanging out with a soon-to-be-former Doctor Who in a rural Welsh GP’s surgery. However, it does eschew the gore that practically defines the genre in favor of PG-13 spectacle.

This family-friendly zombie movie from the critically acclaimed Oregon animation studio Laika is full of references to far more adult films while being light on blood and gore. A social outcast at school because of his electroshock hairstyle and fascination with horror, young Norman Babcock is the only one who can save his hometown from a witch’s curse that raises the dead because of his ability to communicate with spirits. It’s a supernatural adventure that’s reminiscent of an old Scooby-Doo episode, and for small horror fans, it’s a great way to get started with the zombie genre.

Kristen Connolly, Chris Hemsworth, Anna Hutchison, Fran Kranz, and Jesse Williams are five college friends who are taking a short vacation at a secluded forest cabin. Little do they know what horrors lie ahead of them. The young people are attacked by backwoods zombies one by one, but there’s more going on. There is more going on than what first appears, even though two scientists (Bradley Whitford and Richard Jenkins) are controlling the spooky activities.

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The 2010 zombie film Zombie drama saw a revolution thanks to Halloween. The comic book series of the same name by three authors—Charlie Adlard, Robert Kirkman, and Tony Moore—is the basis for this zombie disaster film.

In The Walking Dead, a group of people fight to survive against the possibility of being attacked by zombies that devour flesh. When these people got together, there was never a dull moment of fighting. They initially believed that transformations would only occur in those who were bitten or scratched by zombies. However, the reality is that all living things are afflicted with diseases, and upon death, they will turn into undead.

Dead Snow is a Norwegian black comedy that enjoys nothing more than splattering viscera across wintry landscapes. Despite this, the film never quite lives up to its potential as a comedy or a horror movie. However, it does a good job of demonstrating that the only thing better than punching Nazis is hacking their reanimated corpses to pieces or, in one particularly impressive set piece that’s worth the price of admission, rappelling down a fjord using their intestines. The hikers are pitted against a rising platoon of Third Reich ghouls.

This zombie comedy, which is arguably the craziest zombie film ever produced, understands that despite the grotesqueness of the undead, there is something intrinsically humorous about their shambling and, more importantly, the notion that living humans would try to coexist with them. A meta-pisstake on zombie movies generally, Zombieland stars Woody Harrelson as a hard-bitten survivalist who seems to be thriving in a dystopian world, and features a nerdy shut-in (Jesse Eisenberg) giving survival advice to the audience. With its kinetic visuals, clever set pieces, and lighthearted, occasionally willfully silly script, it’s possibly the only movie on this list—aside from Shaun of the Dead—that truly fits the definition of a “romp.” It also features a legendary cameo that should remain unspoiled for years to come.

When Quentin Tarantino and Robert Rodriguez are seated in a room and told to “make a zombie movie,” the result is Planet Terror. Make it silly. Not a story. There is no problem with the budget. Enjoy yourself. Thus, we were treated to this movie, which is the first part of their double feature Grindhouse. It tells the story of destructive zombie/mutants that were unleashed on the southwestern countryside as a result of a biological weapon. Behind the scenes? Social critique? Robert Rodriguez finds these ideas amusing. Planet Terror is a very good example of a wanton, tasteless film that destroys everything for the sake of entertainment.

From Rose McGowan as the go-go dancer who ends up with a machinegun prosthetic leg to the brave Mexican drifter to Josh Brolin as a sadistic doctor treating the outbreak, you have a colorful cast of misfits with intertwined tales.

Heck, there’s even a brief cameo by Bruce Willis and Michael Biehn from Terminator before they both, you know, die. The movie has a very little plot and quickly descends into a full-on explosions-and-guts firefight, but you’re not supposed to take any of the violence seriously because it’s all so ridiculous and humorous. The movie is merely a parody of low-budget zombie flicks, but strangely it uses far more effects and resources than any of the films it parodies. Both this and its related sibling movie, Death Proof, ought to have brought in much more money at the box office. I’ll never really understand how Grindhouse made only $25 million at the box office, less than a month after 300, a movie with almost the same cast, took in $456 million. However, Planet Terror was due for better.

Similar to James Cameron, Juan Carlos Fresnadillo deftly abandoned the isolationist terror of his 28 Days Later sequel in favor of a full-fledged embrace of the zombie apocalypse, reimagining an action-packed warzone in a zombie-infested England. The opening scene, in which Robert Carlyle flees his family to the hordes, is a clinic in panic. The action in the sequel, which is a Black Hawk Down meets Romero blend of terror, is so intense that you will overlook its flaws.

Combining elements of The Evil Dead franchise’s obsession with sudden demonic conversion with the uncontrollably viral epidemic from 28 Days Later, Jaume Balagueró and Paco Plaza give the stale “found footage” genre a new lease on credibility. Reporter Angela Vidal (Manuela Velasco) discovers an apartment building in Barcelona where people are rapidly dying from a plague while filming a harmless documentary about firefighters. With a 75-minute running time that is lean and mean, [REC] unreels nearly in real time, giving viewers very little time to relax in between vicious attacks. The survivors must be nearing some evil discovery as they battle their way toward the penthouse. Furthermore, ever since the movie’s ending, which features a woman being dragged into a pitch-black, all-encompassing space, it has been widely copied.

2007 was a breakthrough year for post-Blair Witch found-footage horror, including the first Paranormal Activity and Romero’s own Diary of the Dead, but it wasn’t only in the U.S. that people were effectively employing that technique. The best of all the found-footage zombie films is still probably REC, another film on this list that exhibits some playfulness in redetermining exactly what a “zombie” is or isn’t. The Spanish film follows a news crew as they sneak inside a quarantined building that is experiencing the breakout of what essentially appears to be a zombie plague. The fast-moving infected resemble those of 28 Days Later and are later revealed to be demonically possessed in a way that moves through bites, ably blending traditional zombie lore and religious mysticism.

Considering its low budget, the movie manages to feel professional and has some really well-choreographed zombie mayhem scenes that are made all the more claustrophobic by the fact that they are shot from a narrow first-person perspective. Compared to some other horror genres, zombie horror seems to fit the found-footage method better. Is this because, in the digital age, we would all be required to record any outbreak on our phones or other devices? In any case, it’s not nearly as forced as some other works in this specific horror subgenre, and it does a great job of capturing the feeling of what it might be like to be a regular person trapped in a massive apartment complex full of zombies.

Edgar Wright’s ‘rom-zom-com’ made a star of Simon Pegg and a cult hero of its director. Playing the Romero trilogy for big, very British laughs, the film manages to balance outright silliness and surprisingly tough gore with just a hint of romance around the edges. All those zombie parades that keep taking over London? It’s Pegg and Wright’s fault.

Even without the name Dawn of the Dead, fans would still adore Zack Snyder’s George A. Romero riff just for the hilarious opening sequence. With the title in place, however, it seems sacrilegious—a commercial director taking on the holiest of horror satires while including the tiniest bit of criticism on consumerism. But thanks to screenwriter James Gunn, Snyder’s Dawn of the Dead manages to function as a fast-paced, gory zombie action movie with likable survivors. With the terrible Army of the Dead, Snyder would miss the mark on his comeback to the genre, demonstrating that maybe the filmmaker would do better with a major studio in charge.

Cemetery Man by Michele Soavi opens with a classic zombie movie setup: The dead come back to life on the seventh night following their burial, wailing for more meat, only to be quickly put to death by cemetery caretaker Francesco Dellamorte (Rupert Everett) with the obligatory bullet to the brain. However, the movie soon takes a strange turn and stops being a darkly humorous object lesson in gory special effects. It also functions as a surprisingly poetic, if depressing, reflection on the joys and tribulations of romantic obsession and, more astonishingly, as a deliriously detailed plunge into pure madness. The boundaries between dream, delusion, and everyday life are deftly blurred by Soavi and screenwriter Gianni Romoli, building to a stunning climax that challenges not just the validity of the characters’ distinct identities but also the very essence of reality.

Whether he realized it or not, George A. Romero spent the entire 1970s developing Dawn of the Dead, his vision coalescing into a trashy, tragic, operatic, and seamy horror-action picture. In keeping with the traditions of our political leaders and celebrities, the movie dramatizes cycles of revolution by following working-class characters as they experience a taste of a rarefied life. They wall themselves off from the public and become resentful of those who come clamoring to get a glimpse of the wealth. The dead—a constantly changing symbol of society’s marginalized outliers—finally inherit the Earth after the protagonists are overthrown from the vantage point of their shopping mall. The new revolutionaries are corrupted as well, destroying a utopia that is actually a hell of impersonal corporate consumerism. Dawn of the Dead, however, also celebrates America’s promise. The most thrilling parts of the movie depict a mini-democracy in action, with men of color forming bonds with white men and women to steer a dying society in the right direction. They fail, but in a resolution that subtly contradicts the depressing conclusion of Night of the Living Dead, they force themselves to rise once more.

As they journey to the West Indies by boat, a cynical British man named Paul Holland (Tom Conway) warns a gullible Canadian woman, “Everything seems beautiful because you don’t understand.” His wise words serve as an omen for things to come, especially in light of the sneaky menace that permeates every sweaty frame of Jacques Tournuer’s sleepy I Walked with a Zombie. Here, death is elemental; it floats on the wind, is buried beneath the surface of the earth, and shimmers in the ocean current like fluorescent lights. In a foreign land where historical trauma runs so deep, Western stoicism is futile. Respecting local customs and superstitions is essential for the emotionally distraught characters in the movie to survive, even if it means plunging headfirst into a terrifying rabbit hole tinged with voodoo.

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